Riding the Famous Alaska Highway
Posted by The Editors on

We began our journey on a brisk Anchorage morning; preparing the BMW R1200GS for our Southeastern expedition down the Alaska Highway. The Alaska Highway was constructed during WWII in order to connect Alaska with the continental United States via Canada. While construction was complete by 1942, the highway did not open to the public until 6 years later as the spirit of American exploration reignited in the post-war era. In its nascent stages, the highway gained notoriety for its rough and challenging pass. However, travel today is much more scenic.  The entire 1,390 mile stretch is fully paved and allows road trippers, bikers, and nature enthusiasts from around the world to enjoy the splendor of many historic mileposts.



We began our journey along the Alaska Highway in Denali Park-- a sparsely populated region (a mere 219 inhabitants) rich in natural beauty. We entered the highway here, and began our Southeastern journey towards Dawson Creek.


Our first notable stop was the Post Forest. There are over 72,000 signs exhibited in the forest, left by the many travelers who passed through over the years. Additionally, it now contains the famous Ball and Buck Logo-- If you find it, let us know!


Our next major stop was Liard River Hot Springs in Provincial Park, British Columbia, marked by bright “Welcome to Canada” signs. This is a must see! There is a park entrance fee but it is well worth it. Aside from the relaxing hot spring, there is a wide variety wildlife roaming the park.

We experienced man-made splendors throughout our journey as well--including lodging along the shore of Mucho Lake at Northern Rockies Lodge in British Columbia. The lodge is massive, perfectly lit, with a collection of seaplanes. Mucho Lake is simply magnificent-- it sits at the base of the towering mountains of the Northern Rockies and the land is rich with pine trees. We arrived during “Blue Magic”--a 15 minute portion of the daily sunset where the world briefly appears through a blue lens.


Our first notable stop was the Post Forest. There are over 72,000 signs exhibited in the forest, left by the many travelers who passed through over the years. Additionally, it now contains the famous Ball and Buck Logo-- If you find it, let us know!

Fourth on the list is Kluane National Park Reserve, in Yukon Territory. Kluane National Park Reserve is a World Heritage site, declared by the UNESCO. There is spectacular views of some of the highest mountains in Canada, and beautiful flowing crystal clear rivers with snowy a mountainous back drop.

Our last stop, Dawson Creek (Mile 0) which is located in the downtown area, between 10th Street and 102nd Avenue. This is where ours and everyone’s journey on the Alaska Highway comes to an end.  Once we were done touring the town, we checked out the Alaska Highway house, grabbed a bite to eat and continued on to Bozeman Montana.


We then proceeded to Kluane National Park Reserve in Yukon Territory. This park was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1994. Here you can follow beautiful, crystal-clear rivers while enjoying a spectacular view of some of Canada’s highest, snow-capped, mountains in the backdrop.


Our last stop, Dawson Creek (Mile 0) is located in the downtown area, between 10th Street and 102nd Avenue. This is where ours and everyone’s journey on the Alaska Highway came to an end.  Once we were done touring the town, we checked out the Alaska Highway House, grabbed a bite to eat, and continued on to Bozeman Montana.




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